Standards-Based Unit Plan

Title of Unit: I am Someone Special

Grade Level(s): K

Curriculum Areas: Fine Arts, Mathematics, Educational Technology, and Language Arts

Developed by: Constance Loftis Date: December 2002

General Learner Outcomes:

• The ability to be responsible for one's own learning.

• The understanding that it is essential for human beings to work together.

• The ability to be involved in complex thinking and problem solving.

• The ability to recognize and produce quality performance and quality products.

• The ability to use a variety of communication skills to function effectively in society.

• The ability to use a variety of technologies effectively and ethically.

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Main Standards:

Hawaii Content and
Performance Standards

Benchmarks

Performance Standards

FINE ARTS: VISUAL ARTS

1. Students understand and apply *art materials, *techniques, and *processes in creating original artworks based on ideas, experiences, stories, and opinions.

• Apply materials, *techniques, and *processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories.

• Use *art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner.

The student

1. Communicates an idea, experience, or story, which is recognizable in the work.

2. Reflects effective choices of materials, techniques, and processes in the creation of the artwork.

3. Reflects effective use/application of materials, techniques, and processes in the creation of the artwork.

4. (Although not visible in the artwork) uses materials and tools with safety in mind; and displays responsible behavior through:
-taking only enough materials to execute the artwork;
-using tools only for the purposes intended;
-not intentionally "dirtying" people in work area;
-returning unused portions of paint and paper;
-cleaning brushes, palettes, and work area at the end of the activity.

MATHEMATICS: DATA ANALYSIS; STATISTICS; AND PROBABILITY

2. Students interpret data using methods of exploratory data analysis.

• Describe parts of the organized data (e.g., "How many more red than blue?") and the data as a whole (e.g., "What is the total?").

• Identify those parts of the data that have special characteristics (e.g., "Which color was most? Least?").

The student

1. Describes parts of the data.

2. Describes the data as a whole.

3. Identifies those parts of the data that have special characteristics (e.g., "Which color was most? Least?").

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY: BASIC OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS

1. Students demonstrate a sound understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems. Students are proficient in the use of technology.

• Use input devices for computers such as the mouse, keyboard, and microphone and various information storage devices such as disk drives.

• Use a variety of media and technology resources for directed and independent learning activities and the creation of products.

• Communicate appropriate terminology for technology tools and concepts.

• Demonstrate proper care procedures for hardware and software devices.

The student

1. Demonstrates to the instructor that he or she is able to perform basic processes that include creating, storing and editing text information and graphical information on a computer.

2. Demonstrates competency in accessing information from CD-ROMs and other storage media, from software programs, and from the Internet as appropriate for the student's developmental level.

3. Consistently utilizes the proper terminology for various hardware and software program functions when using computers in class.

4. Regularly shows responsible behavior for the care of computers and of information stored in computers in the classroom.

Process Standards: (Secondary Standards)

Hawaii Content and Performance Standards

Benchmarks

Performance Standards

FINE ARTS: VISUAL ARTS

5. Students reflect upon the meaning, nature, and value of one's own works and the works of others through description, *analysis, interpretation, and judgment.

• Share and justify feelings and opinions when assessing artworks and understand that there are different but equally acceptable responses.

• Describe and respond to own artworks and works of others in terms of qualities and attributes.

The student

2. Expresses and shares feelings and opinions as to how one accomplished the mood and feelings of the artwork.

3. Describes own art work using the language of art (elements and principles of art).

LANGUAGE ARTS: READING AND LITERATURE- RANGE

1. Read a range of literary and informative texts for a variety of purposes.

• Read narrative and informative texts.

• Read for enjoyment and to gain information.

The student

2. Reads a range of texts including comfortable and familiar texts as well as challenging and unfamiliar texts.

4. Reads for many purposes- -for appreciation and enjoyment, to gain information, and to perform simple tasks.

LANGUAGE ARTS: READING AND LITERATURE - COMPREHENSION PROCESSES

2. Use strategies within the reading processes to construct meaning

• Draw on personal experiences and prior knowledge to comprehend text.

The student

1. Makes reasonable predictions using information from the title, pictures, text, prior knowledge, personal experience.

2. Uses personal knowledge and the experiences shared by others to develop understanding and bring meaning to what is read.

3. Asks questions about what was read.

4. Rereads, continues reading, cross-checks information when reading does not make sense.

LANGUAGE ARTS: WRITING - RANGE

1. Write using various forms to communicate for a variety of purposes and audiences

• Write thoughts and ideas using different forms (e.g., stories, journals, letters).

The student

1. Expresses thoughts and ideas through pictures, scribbles, words, dictated stories, and conventional writing.

LANGUAGE ARTS: ORAL COMMUNICATION - ATTITUDES AND ENGAGEMENT

5. Demonstrate confidence as communicators, and find value and satisfaction in sharing ideas with others.

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

The student

1. Willingly participates in oral activities, e.g., role playing, dramatization, share-and-tell, discussion.

2. Shows an eagerness to express self and ideas orally.

LANGUAGE ARTS: ORAL COMMUNICATION - COMMUNICATION PROCESSES

2. Uses strategies within speaking and listening processes to construct and communicate meaning.

• Demonstrate give and take in communication and respond appropriately to what is said.

• Ask questions for clarification.

• Listen attentively by focusing attention on a speaker's message.

The student

1. Demonstrates give and take in conversation and discussion.

2. Uses and responds to turn-taking signals in a conversation or discussion.

3. Knows when he/she is not understood and asks or responds to questions for clarification.

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY: TECHNOLOGY A TOOL FOR PRODUCTIVITY

3. Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity. Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, preparing publications, and producing other creative works.

• Create appropriate multimedia products and presentations appropriate to own developmental level.

• Know features and uses of current and emerging technology.

• Use similar technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem-solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories.

The student

1. Uses developmentally appropriate software programs to create stories, reports or essays that combine any combination of text, pictures, sounds, and video.

Essential Question

How are we special? How are we different? How are we alike?

 

Culminating Activity/Task:

The student will create a hardcopy and electronic self-portrait to be included in a classroom book about the students in our class.

Portraits should include:

• a label

• a picture that looks like the student of the day

• all parts of the head

• accurate skin, hair, eye, and clothing color

• a hardcopy portrait outlined with pencil and colored with crayons and a computer portrait outlined with black and colored with colors

 

Assessment for culminating task:

Students will be assessed on their ability to create a portrait based on criteria in a portrait rubric.

I can make a complete portrait.

I make a label at the top of my paper.

I draw a picture that looks like a person.

I include all the parts of a head.

I draw a picture that looks like the student of the day.

My picture is accurate. (correct hair, eye, and clothing color)

Learning Experiences (Lesson Plans):

Benchmarks

Learning Activities

Assessments (ongoing)

• Share and justify feelings and opinions when assessing artworks and understand that there are different but equally acceptable responses.

• Describe and respond to own artworks and works of others in terms of qualities and attributes.

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

Starter Activity Part 1

Driving Question: What are portraits? Which portrait matches a picture of a person from the past?

The teacher will browse through the information at http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/play/portrait1/portrait.html to find background information for upcoming lessons.

The teacher will read aloud the Face 2 Face story by following the links starting at http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/play/portrait2/a1.html. Next, the teacher will play the Face 2 Face portraits from the past game by clicking on one of the pictures and following the directions provided. This activity can be done as a large group or with buddies if students are paired with older students. In this game, students match portraits with pictures of people from the past.

Personal Communication: Discussion

• Share and justify feelings and opinions when assessing artworks and understand that there are different but equally acceptable responses.

• Describe and respond to own artworks and works of others in terms of qualities and attributes.

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

Starter Activity Part 2

Driving Question: What makes a good self-portrait? What facial parts do you need to include when you draw a portrait of someone? What are the proportions of the face? What shapes do facial features resemble? What are common mistakes do you see in these portraits?

The teacher will share the information at http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_proportion.html to demonstrate techniques of face proportions. Next, the teacher will share the information at http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_face_shapes.html to demonstrate techniques of face shapes. Last, the teacher will guide the class through the What's wrong with this portrait? activity. In this activity, students evaluate what is wrong with portraits. By dragging the cursor over the pictures, students can find out what is wrong

Personal Communication: Discussion

• Apply materials, *techniques, and *processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories.

• Use *art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner.

• Demonstrate give and take in communication and respond appropriately to what is said.

• Ask questions for clarification.

• Listen attentively by focusing attention on a speaker's message.

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

Lesson 1

Driving Question: What facial parts do you need to include when you make a portrait of someone? How do you make a portrait of a person using face shapes and proportion? What materials match the student of the day's skin, eye, hair, and clothing color?

The teacher can browse the information at Picture Me Portraits for general ideas prior to starting the lesson.

This lesson begins with a discussion about facial features and materials. After the discussion, students will make observations about the student of the day as the teacher helps students focus by asking questions like "What color is his/her face? Eyes? Hair? What shapes do you see? Where are the parts of your face located?" Students will work in pairs to discuss their observations. This will allow students to learn from each other.

As the students choose materials to use for their self-portrait, they will begin creating their portraits. The teacher will circulate to help as needed and provide feedback. This part of the activity can be done in small groups and/or as individuals. After students complete their portraits of the student of the day, their work will be shared with the class.

Personal Communication: Discussion

Product: Hardcopy portrait

Portrait Rubric

• Draw on personal experiences and prior knowledge to comprehend text.

• Read narrative and informative texts.

• Read for enjoyment and to gain information.

• Describe parts of the organized data (e.g., "How many more red than blue?") and the data as a whole (e.g., "What is the total?").

• Identify those parts of the data that have special characteristics (e.g., "Which color was most? Least?").

• Demonstrate give and take in communication and respond appropriately to what is said.

• Ask questions for clarification.

• Listen attentively by focusing attention on a speaker's message.

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

• Write thoughts and ideas using different forms (e.g., stories, journals, letters).

Lesson 2

Driving Question: Who is this student? What is the student's name? How old is this student? What color hair and eyes does this student have? How many siblings does this student have? What is this student's favorite color? What is this student's favorite food?

Each student will have the opportunity to be the student of the day. Each day, all of the students will make portraits of the student of the day. The teacher will post the student's self-portrait, and the student of the day will take home the pictures the other students drew.

After the students make portraits of the student of the day, the class will interview the student. The teacher will make a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel with the following information: eye color, hair color, age, number of siblings, favorite color, and favorite food. Each day, the teacher will add the student of the day to the chart with his/her information. The teacher will do this using a laptop or desktop computer connected with a TV monitor so students could see what he/she was doing.

Personal Communication: Interviewing, Discussion

Product: Hardcopy portrait

Data Analysis Rubric

• Draw on personal experiences and prior knowledge to comprehend text.

• Draw on personal experiences and prior knowledge to comprehend text.

• Read narrative and informative texts.

• Read for enjoyment and to gain information.

• Describe parts of the organized data (e.g., "How many more red than blue?") and the data as a whole (e.g., "What is the total?").

• Identify those parts of the data that have special characteristics (e.g., "Which color was most? Least?").

• Show willingness to initiate and/or engage in oral activities with others.

Lesson 3

Driving Question: What does the student of the day have in common with other students in the class? What differences does the student of the day have? What do we notice about the information we have collected so far?

At the end of each lesson, the teacher will have a group discussion about the data in our spreadsheet displayed on a TV monitor. The larger screen would make it easy for students to read the data and see patterns. I would ask "What do you notice?" This question urges students to analyze the data in the chart. For example, one student might notice that three people have names that start with letter J. Another student might be able to read those names. Students also might begin to make generalizations. For example, one student might say that most girls have long hair and most boys have short hair. Another student might notice that more students have black hair than red or blond hair.

Students at all levels would learn from this discussion. Early emergent readers can watch other students model how to use charts to find data. Emergent readers can look at the pictures to find the answer. They might even be able to tell you the name of the person as well. Fluent readers can read the data to find the answer.

If students were hesitant to ask questions, I would ask questions like "What eye/hair color is the most/least common? How many students are 4/5/6? Which students have the same number of brothers and sisters? What is the most/least favorite color? What is the most/least favorite food?

Personal Communication: Discussion

Data Analysis Rubric

• Write thoughts and ideas using different forms (e.g., stories, journals, letters).

• Use input devices for computers such as the mouse, keyboard, and microphone and various information storage devices such as disk drives.

• Use a variety of media and technology resources for directed and independent learning activities and the creation of products.

• Communicate appropriate terminology for technology tools and concepts.

• Demonstrate proper care procedures for hardware and software devices.

• Create appropriate multimedia products and presentations appropriate to own developmental level.

• Know features and uses of current and emerging technology.

• Use similar technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem-solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories.

• Share and justify feelings and opinions when assessing artworks and understand that there are different but equally acceptable responses.

• Describe and respond to own artworks and works of others in terms of qualities and attributes.

• Draw on personal experiences and prior knowledge to comprehend text.

• Read narrative and informative texts.

• Read for enjoyment and to gain information.

Lesson 4

Driving Question: How can we save the work we have done so that everyone may enjoy it?

After all students have had the opportunity to be the student of the day, we would assemble the information into a class book. We would combine the self-portraits of each student with information sheets, which students fill out. All pages would be stapled together and stored in the reading center in the classroom.

After completing a hardcopy class book, I would have students create self-portraits in KidPix using draw/paint tools. I would have them copy their personal information from a paper to the computer. Once the students had completed their self-portraits, I would record each student reading his/her personal information. I would combine all of the slides into a slideshow for the students to enjoy.

After completing the hard copy and electronic classroom books, I would have students vote which self-portrait most resembled a student. Our hardcopy and electronic classroom books would be resources for all students. Early emergent readers can pretend to read the books. Emergent readers can read the names of their classmates using reading strategies (looking at the pictures and trying to find out what makes sense). Fluent readers can read the names of their classmates in addition to the information from the interview.

Students who are familiar with computers or who have difficulty with small motor skills may find it easier to draw and type using technology tools instead of paper and pencil.

Product: Hardcopy class book , electronic portrait, and electronic class book

Personal Communication: Discussion

 

Portrait Rubric

Resources for teacher and students:

MarcoPolo Resources:

Picture Me Portraits lesson plan

http://www.crayola.com/ece/ece_display.cfm?id=93

This is Me: A look at self-portraits for students article

http://www.teachnet.com/lesson/art/selfportr092299.html

I've Just Seen a Face: Portraits lesson plan

http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=270

 

Other on-line resources:

Introduction to portraits

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/play/portrait1/portrait.html

Face 2 Face story

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/play/portrait2/a1.html

Face 2 Face portraits from the past game

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/play/portrait2/face2face.html

Practicing Portraits online activity

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_portrait_drag.html

Technique demonstration of face proportions

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_proportion.html

Technique demonstration of face shapes

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_face_shapes.html

Technique demonstration of What's wrong with this portrait? online activity

http://www.sanford-artedventures.com/create/tech_wrong_portrait1.html

 

Hard Copies:

Book:

Month by Month by Patricia M. Cunningham, et al

Art Supplies:

• White paper

• Pencils

• Crayons

Technology:

• laptop or desktop computer, TV monitor, connector cable

• Spreadsheet software (Microsoft Excel or Appleworks)

• Computer(s) for student use

• Floppy disk(s) for students (if working in multiple locations without a server)

• KidPix Studio Deluxe (for draw/paint and making slideshow)

Strategies:

Students use paper, pencil, and crayons to complete pictures of the student of the day during this unit. After students complete their picture, the teacher uses a laptop or desktop computer, TV monitor, and connector cable to update a personal information spreadsheet daily. The teacher inputs data as students are interviewed. After modeling for a week, the teacher asks for volunteers to input the data.

After all students create a hardcopy self-portrait, the teacher uses a laptop or desktop computer connected to a TV monitor to model how to create a slide in KidPix Studio Deluxe. Students explore these tools for 15 minutes daily on a rotating basis using our two classroom computers. The teacher keeps track of computer use by using a clothespin labeled with each student's name on a paper divided into two columns. The headings are I am waiting for my turn and I have had my turn. Students who are waiting for a turn have a clothespin on one side and those who have had their turn have a clothespin on the other side. At the end of their turn, students move their clothespin from one side to the other. Next, they tap the next student on their shoulder. The new student stops what they are doing to begin their turn. They have the opportunity to catch up on their work later in the day.

Students also have the opportunity to use individual computers in a technology lab every other Wednesday for 45 minutes. The teacher models the activity the students will do that day using a laptop or desktop computer connected to a TV monitor in the classroom before going to the lab. Once the class gets to the lab, the teacher asks for volunteers to explain what the task is. If students have a question, they know to ask the person sitting on either side of them for help before raising their hand. This helps students work together to solve problems and frees up the teacher to answer more difficult questions.

Once students are comfortable using draw/paint, the teacher teaches them how to use disks to save their work. Students continue using disks as they work on their self-portraits. After creating a self-portrait and typing their personal information on a slide, the teacher records students reading their personal information. This is added to a slideshow with all the slides created by the class. Students view the completed project on a TV monitor connected to a laptop or desktop computer.

One way to involve parents/families is to create a newsletter at the beginning of the unit to explain the student of the day concept. The teacher could include strategies, tips, and ideas that family members could use to extend the activity at home. At Open House, the teacher could show parents the bulletin board of self-portraits completed so far and the spreadsheet of student information. The teacher could demonstrate a mini-lesson so parents can understand what their child is learning from this activity. The teacher could also create a class web page and update it daily to reflect what they are doing in the class. At the end of the day, they students could help write a sentence of the day. This would provide information parents can ask their child about to extend what they learned in school that day.

Others:

Field trip to see Mr. Mick's "I am Someone Special" program

Context of Lesson:

In this unit, students are responsible for learning, use thinking/learning strategies, and collaborate with others. The teacher helps students be responsible for their learning by modeling how to create a self-portrait each day. Students take ownership of their work as the see it displayed in the classroom. The teacher helps students use thinking/learning strategies by demonstrating "self talk." The teacher talks out loud as he/she works on an example self-portrait. (Ex. Let's see… my head is round. I'll make an oval for my head. The teacher said to make it fill most of the page. That looks big enough. Now I need to add eyes. They need to be in the center of the oval and big enough that I can fit 5 across. Uh-oh, that's too small. I'd better erase and try again.) As the teacher works on his/her self-portrait, he/she ask for input from students. (Ex. Which color crayon should I use to make my hair?) The class collaborates to share ideas and work.

Tasks in this unit are authentic, challenging, and multidisciplinary. In addition to creating self-portraits, students have an opportunity to practice oral communications as they share personal information in an interview. The group discussion following this interview requires students to analyze information. These skills are required for graduation and valued in the work force. This unit cuts across the subject areas of fine arts, math, technology, and language arts.

Assessment in this unit is performance-based, generative, seamless and ongoing, and equitable. After all students create a self-portrait, the teacher has them share their personal information during sharing time. The teacher scripts the sharing information and assesses each student's oral communication skills. (Ex. Hello everyone. My name is _____. I am __ years old. My hair is _____ and my eyes are _____. I have __ sister(s) and __3 brother(s). My favorite color is _____. My favorite food is _____. Thank you for listening to my sharing.) During group discussions about the data in the spreadsheet, the teacher observes students to make sure everyone is participating. As students switch roles from being in the spotlight to being in the audience, they critique their own work and think of ways to make it better.

The instructional model for this unit is interactive and generative. The teacher helps students (reminds them if they forget to add a major facial feature such as ears or eyebrows), encourages students (You can do it!), and praises students (I like the way you used curvy lines to make your curly hair!). The teacher also helps students construct meaning by guiding them when they were unsure of themselves. By continuously connecting the end product to the small steps that they make, the teacher helps students see the bigger picture.

The learning context for this unit is collaborative, knowledge building and empathetic. As they work on their self-portraits, students talk and share ideas. The teacher reminds them that it is important to respect each person's views, though they may not agree.

Grouping for this unit is heterogeneous. Students work at 4 person tables. They have assigned seats according to ability (1-2 high, 2 mid, 1-2 low). Students may work as small groups and/or individuals. Though the teacher uses assigned seats, he/she also uses flexible grouping. Students may sit in different places throughout the day as they work on different subject areas. During large group work, students can choose where to sit.

Teacher roles in this unit are facilitator, guide, and co-learner/co-investigator. The teacher values group discussion. When students are hesitant to participate, the teacher asks if they want him/her to come back to them. After the teacher gives them some time, he/she comes back again to give the student an opportunity to share. Instead of controlling the discussion, the teacher organizes it. The teacher helps students make connections between what they say and what they have learned by asking questions. The teacher frequently models and redirects students. Students need a clear objective for each lesson. Kindergarten students need concrete examples. If the teacher does not know an answer, he/she should show students what to do. By demonstrating what to do, the teacher helps students see that learning never stops and helps them be responsible for their learning. It also helps students feel safe in the classroom. They know that they can make mistakes and/or admit that they don't know something without feeling embarrassed.

Student roles in this unit are explorer, cognitive apprentice, teacher, and producer. Students have the opportunity to learn about themselves, other students in the class, and art materials. Students also learn that there are endless resources for information. Students are both learners and teachers. As they switch roles, they learn more.

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